Posts Categorized: Strategy

  • Best Practices, For Churches, Practical stuff, Strategy

    The Three-Team Model for Church Growth

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    How many meetings do you go to in a week? My guess: too many. If meetings have overtaken your calendar, it’s probably because you’re a part of a bunch of teams.  Organizations have jumped on the team approach and away from the “department” approach; they form teams of staff from different departments to address unique… Read more »

  • Strategy

    The Church Growth Formula

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    How do churches grow? My last post looked at three key components of church growth: creating share-worthy experiences, fostering authentic community, and providing clear next steps for new people. And all of those are essential! Any church that isn’t offering those three things is in an uphill battle for growth. But organizations are more than… Read more »

  • Strategy

    The Obvious Reasons Your Church Isn’t Growing – and What to Do About It

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    Why do some churches grow, and others don’t? How can it be that a really good church – one that offers great preaching, musically excellent worship, and fantastic kids’ programs – just kind of hovers around the same attendance each week, and isn’t seeing new people come through the door? Straight from the desk of… Read more »

  • Practical stuff, Strategy

    Listen to the Data!

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    Every church comms person hears feedback. Whether it’s from our coworkers or other leaders at church, from volunteers, or from people in the congregation, we hear feedback on our work: “our new website looks terrific.” “I love the graphic for our new children’s event!” Or even, “our new logo is amazing.” It’s the reason we… Read more »

  • Practical stuff, Strategy

    The Measurement Mindset

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    “If it’s not worth measuring, it’s not worth doing.” That’s an old saying in the marketplace, and it’s especially applicable to the discipline of church communications. The measurement mindset might as well be in your job description. It’s that important. It’s not uncommon to get resistance among church staff to this idea. How do you… Read more »

  • Practical stuff, Strategy

    When Not to be Creative

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    Creativity is highly valued in today’s church world. Churches put countless hours into crafting creative elements in their worship services, making promo videos or graphics for a teaching series, even a Christmas video. And this is a good thing! It’s not easy to stand out in today’s crowded infoscape. In the 1970’s, the average person… Read more »

  • Organizational Leadership, Strategy, Uncategorized

    Thoughts on “Belong Before Believe”

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    People belong to a group based on its actions, more than its words. They choose to belong to a group when that group does things that they want to get on board with. Every group that people belong to outside of church does stuff. Clubs, sports leagues, civic organizations… people join them to do, not… Read more »

  • Best Practices, Strategy

    Missional vs. Attractional – a Thought Experiment

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    Here’s a thought experiment: imagine you have a friend who’s far from God, and they’re about to head out on a mission to Mars. You’ve got one hour with them before they take off, and that hour is on Sunday morning. If you’d rather have them hear the gospel by watching a great sermon by… Read more »

  • Organizational Leadership, Strategy

    The Social Flywheel

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    Having a strong social presence is too often the end goal (either by intent, by misstep, or by default) for churches and other organizations that remain unclear about how social engagement contributes to having more people attending church on Sundays or participating in midweek ministry.

  • Practical stuff, Strategy

    The All-Important, Under-Used Elevator Pitch

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    Before I got into church marketing, I spent time in several completely different industries: retail banking, enterprise software, and private education. All required different approaches to marketing, communication, and sales. But if there’s a common thread across all of them, it was this: the products and services I was helping sell were complicated. Communicating about… Read more »